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Content

Part I

1. Overview: The Writing Process

1.1 Overview

1.2 Five Evaluation Criteria

2. How do I pick a topic?

3. What are Some Other Ways to Get Ideas?

3.1 What is a Brainstorm?

3.2 What is Clustering?

3.3 What is Freewriting?

4. How Do I make an Outline?

5. Researching

5.1 Introduction to Research

5.2 Determine the Role of Research in Your Writing

5.3 Finding Scholarly Sources

5.4 Evaluating Scholarly Sources

5.5 Evaluating Non-Scholarly Sources

5.6 Evaluating Web Sources

5.7 Consider Your Project

5.8 Integrating Scholarly Sources

5.9 Cite Sources to Avoid Plagiarism

6. Drafting

6.1 Overview of Drafting

6.2 Drafting: The Process

6.3 During the Drafting Process

6.4 Final Thoughts on Drafting

6.5 Dealing with Writer’s Block

6.6 Meeting the Minimum Word Count

6.7 Title of Your Essay

6.8 Final Thoughts on Drafting

7. Editing

7.1 Editing and Revising: One and the Same?

7.2 Sentence Structure

7.3 Editing Tips

7.4 Perspectives on Style

8. Reviewing

8.1 Overview of Reviewing

8.2 Establishing Criteria

8.3 Writing Helpful Comments

8.4 Responding to Criticism

8.5 Peer Review Sample 1

8.6 Peer Review Sample 2

9. Revising

9.1 Overview of Revising

9.2 Differences Between Revising, Editing, and Proofreading

9.3 A Change for the Better

9.4 Analyze Each Part of Your Paper

9.5 Before and After Revision Examples

Part II

10. Reading Analytically

10.1 Reading with a Purpose

10.2 Reading Analytically

10.3 Summary and Response

10.4 Reading Activities

Part III

11. From Reading to Writing

11.1 The Case for Critical Writers

11.2 Rhetorical Situations

11.3 Writing as a Process

11.4 Chapter Vocabulary

12. What is Exposition in Writing

12.1 Types of Exposition

12.2 Find a Topic, Read, Discuss, and Research

12.3 Structure of an Analytical/Expository Essay

12.4 Sample Exposition Assignments

12.5 Sample Papers

12.6 Analytical Essay Checklist Exercise

13 What is Evaluative Writing?

13.1 Establishing Evaluative Criteria

13.2 How to Evaluate

13.3 Structure of the Evaluative Essay

13.4 Sample Assignments

14 A Brief Guide to the Art of Persuasion and Argument

14.1 Basic Argument Essay Structure

14.2 Strengthening Your Argument

14.3 Sample Essay

15 How to use this Book—Pedagogical Background for Students and Teachers

15.1 Student-Centered Writing and Learning Communities

15.2 Rhetorical Situations

15.3 Assignments and Activities

15.4 Student-Centered Writing and Learning Communities

15.5 Rhetorical Situations Applications

15.6 Writing as Process

15.7Introductory/Pedagogical Vocabulary

16 Introduction: Description, Narration, and Reflection

16.1 Description & Narration Vocabulary

16.2 Techniques

16.3 Descriptive Section Vocabulary

16.4 Imagery and Experiential Language

17 Activities

17.1 Specificity Taxonomy

17.2 Micro-Ethnography

17.3 Imagery Inventory

17.4 The Dwayne Johnson Activity

17.5 Surprising Yourself: Constraint-Based Scene Description

17.6 Image Builder

18 Model Texts by Student Authors

18.1 Sample 1

18.2 Sample 2

19 Telling a Story

19.1 Vocabulary and ideas to consider as you write narratives.

19.2 Techniques

20 Story Activities

20.1 Idea Generation: What Stories Can I Tell?

20.2 Idea Generation: Mapping an Autobiography

20.3 Experimenting with Voice and Dialogue

21 Model Texts by Student Authors

21.1 Sample 1

21.2 Sample 2

21.3 Sample 3

22 Reflecting on an Experience

22.1 Reflective Vocabulary

22.2 Techniques

22.3 Reflective Activities

22.4 Model Texts by Student Authors

22.5 Assignment

22.6 One Example of a Peer Workshop Process

License

Icon for the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Expression and Inquiry by Chris Manning, Sally Pierce, and Melissa Lucken is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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