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Extra Help Section

Correct Run-on Sentences and Comma Splices

A run-on sentence consists of two sentences separated by no mark of punctuation at all.

EX: The school bell rang at 3 o’clock the children jumped up and shouted joyfully.

The preceding sentence is a run-on sentence because the author hasn’t put a period at the end of the first sentence, before the second.

Comma Splices

A comma splice consists of two sentences separated by a comma, thus joining them incorrectly.

EX: The school bell rang at 3 o’clock, the children jumped up and shouted joyfully.

The preceding sentence is a comma splice because the author put a comma at the end of the first sentence, before the second, thus incorrectly joining the two sentences.

Use the following rules to solve run-ons and comma splices:

1.Put a period between the sentences.

The school bell rang at 3 o’clock. The children jumped up and shouted joyfully.

2.Put a semicolon between the sentences.

The school bell rang at 3 o’clock; the children jumped up and shouted joyfully.

3.Put a coordinating conjunction with a comma between the sentences. (Use the FANBOYS when applying this rule.)

The school bell rang at 3 o’clock, so the children jumped up and shouted joyfully.

4.Use a subordinating conjunction with a comma when needed. (Use your list of subordinating conjunctions when applying this rule.)

When the school bell rang at 3 o’clock, the children jumped up and shouted joyfully.

The school bell rang at 3 o’clock while the children jumped up and shouted joyfully.

Correcting Run-ons and Comma Splices Activity

Use four ways to correct the following run-on sentences and comma splices

  1. Bill sent a beautiful bouquet of flowers Loretta refused to forgive him.

Insert a period:

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Insert a semicolon:

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Insert a coordinating conjunction:

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Insert a subordinating conjunction:

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  1. It rained all day, my yard looked like a pond.

Insert a period:

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Insert a semicolon:

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Insert a coordinating conjunction:

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Insert a subordinating conjunction:

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  1. Bring your own coffee supplies the department cannot afford to purchase them anymore.

Insert a period:

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Insert a semicolon:

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Insert a coordinating conjunction:

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Insert a subordinating conjunction:

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  1. Children played joyfully at the playground, their mothers watched that they didn’t wander far.

Insert a period:

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Insert a semicolon: ___________________________________________________________________

Insert a coordinating conjunction:

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Insert a subordinating conjunction:

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  1. I love owning a dog that doesn’t include yappy little ones like Chihuahuas.

Insert a period:

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Insert a semicolon:

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Insert a coordinating conjunction:

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Insert a subordinating conjunction:

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License

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To the extent possible under law, Cheryl McCormick, Sue Hank, and Ninna Roth have waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to Correct Run-on Sentences and Comma Splices, except where otherwise noted.

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