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Story Activities

20.1 Idea Generation: What Stories Can I Tell?

You may already have an idea of an important experience in your life about which you could tell a story. Although this might be a significant experience, it is most definitely not the only one worth telling. (Remember: question your first ideas—are they best?)

Just as with description, good narration isn’t about shocking content but rather about effective and innovative writing. In order to broaden your options before you begin developing your story, complete the organizer on the following pages.

Then, choose three of the list items from this page that you think are especially unique or have had a serious impact on your life experience. On a separate sheet of paper, free-write about each of your three list items for no less than five minutes per item.

List 5 places that are significant to you (real, fiction, or imaginary)
1)   
2)   
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5)   

 

List 10 People who have influenced your life in some way (positive or negative, acquainted or not, real or fictional)
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10)

 

List 10 ways that you identify yourself (roles, adjectives, or names)
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9)   
10)

 

List 3 obstacles you’ve overcome to be where you are today
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3)   

 

List 3 difficult moments – tough decisions, traumatic or challenging experiences, or troubling circumstances
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2)   
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License

Icon for the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Expression and Inquiry by Chris Manning, Sally Pierce, and Melissa Lucken is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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